Larry Fink

"Racism which formed this country, still forms this country deeply.  We have a lot of work to do... [D]emocracy by its very definition, is supposed to be a conversation with the past, a conversation with the present and the conversation for the future.  Right now we’re stuck with a non-conversant modality, which is nothing but hostile stagnation." Larry Fink, 2020
 

On 28th August 1963, more than 2,000 buses, 21 chartered trains, 10 chartered airliners, plus a huge number of cars, all converged on Washington D.C. All regularly scheduled planes, trains, and buses were also filled to capacity.

The March on Washington – or March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, to give it it’s full title – attracted a quarter of a million people, including Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Judy Garland and Sammy Davis, Jr.

It was the first time in the history of the United States that a political event of such size had been initiated and mobilised by African Americans. 

Dr Martin Luther King closed the march with his era-defining I Have A Dream speech.

Following the recently offered prints of Aria Isadora’s March on Manhattan image, David Hill Gallery and Carrie Scott are working with Larry Fink to release prints of Many Shades of Concern, Washington, August 28, 1963.  In the composition, a southern sharecropper takes center stage.  His stature and stance, flanked on either side by billowing American flags, is totemic.  He is powerful in his determination, his back turned against the accepted symbol of the so-called 'American Dream', just as society has turned its back to him. 57 years later, Americans like him are still waiting for a change to come.

100% of net income will go to The Until Freedom organisation, as per the wishes of Larry Fink, Carrie Scott and David Hill. Neither the artist or the dealers will profit from print sales.
 

Many Shades of Concern, Washington, August 28, 1963 is available in two sizes:

16 x 20 in. (40 x 50 cm) silver gelatin exhibition print, signed by the artist and numbered, in an edition of eight. These prints are priced at £5,000, including VAT, unframed

9 x 12 in. (23 x 30.5 cm) Baryta print, stamped with the artist's signature, in unlimited edition, at GBP £100, including VAT, unframed

 

Until Freedom is a social justice organisation working to address systemic and racial injustice. The founders and leaders of Until Freedom have a proven track record of over two decades of collective work in criminal justice reform, gun violence prevention, immigrant rights, and cultural engagement. In the words of Until Freedom, 'Everyone is worthy, everyone is needed to win'.